Dating and determination of firing temperature of ancient potteries from Yumina archaeological site, Arequipa, Peru

Joseff R. Mejia-Bernal, Jorge Sabino Ayala Arenas, Nilo F. Cano, Javier F. Rios-Orihuela, Carlos D. Gonzales-Lorenzo, Shigueo Watanabe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Pottery fragments from the Yumina archaeological site, Arequipa, Peru, were dated by means of thermoluminescence (TL) and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique was used to study the firing temperature using the iron signal (Fe3+) as a firing temperature reference. The ages of the samples were found to be between 1190 ± 30 and 1240 ± 80 years (777 ± 80 and 827 ± 30 A.D.) determined by both techniques. The firing temperature of ceramics was found to be around 550 ± 50 °C. Our study, based on the combination of TL and OSL techniques to study Yumina archaeological site pottery, will be helpful for archaeologists in Peru. With the results of this investigation, we can understand the chronology and determine the areas of dispersion and density of the archaeological occupation in the Arequipa Valley. In addition, the calculated ages are consistent with the occupation period of the Yumina archaeological site estimated by stratigraphic analysis of the potteries.

Original languageEnglish
Article number108930
JournalApplied Radiation and Isotopes
Volume155
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was carried out with partial financial support from Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo - FAPESP , Brazil (Processes number 2014/03085-0 and 2018/17419-8 ).

Funding Information:
This work was carried out with partial financial support from Funda??o de Amparo ? Pesquisa do Estado de S?o Paulo - FAPESP, Brazil (Processes number 2014/03085-0 and 2018/17419-8).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Dating
  • EPR
  • Firing temperature
  • OSL
  • TL

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