Granular mechanics of normally consolidated fine soils

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Abstract

In this paper, duality is demonstrated to be one of the inherent properties of granular packings, by mapping the stress-strain curve into the diagram that relates the pore ratio and the localization of the contact point. In this way, it is demonstrated that critical state is not related to the maximum void ratio, but to a unique value related to two different angles of packing, one limiting the domain of the dense state, and other limiting the domain of the loose state. As a consequence, packings can be dilative or contractive, as mutually exclusive states, except by the critical state point, where equations for both granular packings are equally valid. Further analysis shows that stresses, in a dilative packing, are transmitted by chains of contact forces, and, in a contractive packing, by shear forces. So that, stresses, for the first case, depend on the initial void ratio, and, for the second case, are independent. As it is known, normally consolidated and lightly overconsolidated fine soils are in loose state, and, hence, their strength is constant, because it does not depend on their initial void ratio; except at the critical state, for which, the consolidated-drained angle of friction is related to the plasticity index or the liquid limit. In this fashion, experimental results reported by several authors around the world are confronted with the theory, showing a good agreement.

Original languageEnglish
Article number12010
JournalEPJ Web of Conferences
Volume140
DOIs
StatePublished - 30 Jun 2017
Event8th International Conference on Micromechanics on Granular Media, Powders and Grains 2017 - Montpellier, France
Duration: 3 Jul 20177 Jul 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Authors, published by EDP Sciences, 2017.

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