Granular mechanics of the critical state of coarse soils

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4 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper, coarse soils are modeled by granular packings, because both of them have similar characteristics, such as: gaseousity, duality, dilatancy, fragility and hyperbolicity. By virtue of these properties, it is assumed that the contact force ensemble remains the same, while the packing changes because of its dual character, regarding the compactness of the soil. For the dense state, both assemblages coincide themselves, forming chains of contact forces; the transmission of stresses obeys the Trollope's hypothesis of centroidal reactions; and the volumetric strain increases. For the loose state, the packing adopts a "passive" distribution, yielding a constant angle of internal friction at failure; so that, the strain is contractive and the stress transmission occurs fundamentally by shear, in a similar fashion to the Rowe's mechanism. In the figures, the good correspondence between the results of the theory and the reported experimental data is shown.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPowders and Grains 2013 - Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Micromechanics of Granular Media
Pages197-200
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013
Event7th International Conference on Micromechanics of Granular Media: Powders and Grains 2013 - Sydney, NSW, Australia
Duration: 8 Jul 201312 Jul 2013

Publication series

NameAIP Conference Proceedings
Volume1542
ISSN (Print)0094-243X
ISSN (Electronic)1551-7616

Conference

Conference7th International Conference on Micromechanics of Granular Media: Powders and Grains 2013
Country/TerritoryAustralia
CitySydney, NSW
Period8/07/1312/07/13

Keywords

  • contact forces
  • contractancy
  • Critical state
  • dilatancy
  • friction angle
  • granular stresses
  • packings

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